Sue the T.rex coming to Hays for two-month stay at the Sternberg Museum of Natural History
02/01/2001

Note to editors and news directors: The beginning of the preparation and construction phases are tentative. To arrange coverage during these or any other times, please call Fort Hays State University's Office of University Relations at (785) 628-4206, or e-mail kbeyers@fhsu.edu.
HAYS, KS -- "A T. rex Named Sue" is coming to Fort Hays State University's Sternberg Museum of Natural History and will be in residence there from Feb. 24 until April 29.

Sue Hendrickson, the field paleontologist who found the fossil, and for whom the fossil was named, will also be at the Sternberg Museum during the opening weekend, Feb. 24-25.

This exhibit features a life-sized, articulated cast of the 67-million-year-old fossil called Sue, the largest, best preserved and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found. The exhibit has many other components, including a full-sized cast of Sue's skull mounted at eye level, interactive anatomical models and several interactive stations that allow visitors to put together a large-format 3D puzzle of Sue's skeleton, a Sue-eye-view of the Cretaceous world and a video of CT images of Sue's skull.

The traveling exhibit, one of only two touring the United States, was made possible because of an educational and financial partnership among Chicago's Field Museum, McDonald's Corp., Walt Disney World Resort and private individuals.

Additional local and regional support was provided by McDonald's of Hays, Russell and WaKeeney, McDonald's Mid-Kansas Advertising Cooperative, McDonald's Kansas City Region and Coca Cola.

Additional regional support was provided by Pepsi Bottling Company.

Below are the main events related to Sue during her two-month stay at the Sternberg Museum:
February 1

"A T. rex Named Sue" arrived at Fort Hays State University's Sternberg Museum of Natural History.

February 4-18

Staff at the Sternberg Museum will be unpacking crates, preparing and organizing the exhibit materials.

February 14

President Edward H. Hammond will give Sue buttons and Pepsi-Cola cans emblazoned with Sue information to legislators and their staff members at the Capitol in Topeka.

February 20

Construction of the exhibit, including assembly of Sue herself, is scheduled to begin.

9 a.m.: Opening ceremonies in the Seibel Lobby of the Sternberg Museum.

1 p.m.: "A T. rex Named Sue" opens to the public.

3-5 p.m.: Sue Hendrickson, the field paleontologist who found Sue, will sign autographs and books in the Seibel Lobby of the Sternberg Museum. Hendrickson will be at the museum most of the day.

Ronald McDonald will be available at various times to visit with children and pose for photos.

February 25

Noon-2 p.m.: Sue Hendrickson will sign autographs and books in the Seibel Lobby of the Sternberg Museum. Hendrickson will be at the museum most of the day.

3 p.m.: "Tyrannosaurus Sue: A Family Concert" begins in the Beach/Schmidt Performing Arts Center in Sheridan Hall on the campus of Fort Hays State University. The concert will feature the Hays Symphony, conducted by Daniel Delisi, performing 'Tyrannosaurus Sue, A Cretaceous Concerto," and music from the scores of King Kong and Jurassic Park. An added attraction will be a special performance of "DinoMotion" by the O'Loughlin Elementary School fourth-grade class.
Ronald McDonald will be available at various times to visit with children and pose for photos.

February 26-April 27

9:30 a.m.: About 200 school groups have so far scheduled tours of the Sternberg Museum during the time of the Sue exhibit. These guided tours begin at 9:30 a.m.

March 10

7 p.m.: Dr. Bruce Schumacher will talk about the process of preparing the fossil known as Sue. His presentation will be in the Memorial Union on the campus of Fort Hays State University. While working for the Field Museum, he headed up the preparation laboratory at Disney's Dinoland, Orlando, FL, where much of the preparation work on Sue took place. Schumacher earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Fort Hays State's Geosciences Department before earning a doctorate at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. He is now a zone paleontologist for the United States Forest Service.

March 26-30

"Ronald McDonald and the Amazing Thinking Machine," featuring Ronald McDonald, will visit schools in the Hays, Russell and WaKeeney area. This 40-minute educational program shows K-3 children how to use a variety of resources to solve problems. Ronald builds on the natural interest that children this age have in dinosaurs and uses music, magic tricks, games and audiovisual effects.

March 31

7 p.m.: Dr. Chris Brochu, Field Museum paleontologist, will discuss the scientific significance of Sue in a presentation at FHSU's Memorial Union. Because Sue is so complete and was so well preserved, the scientific knowledge of Tyrannosaurus rex was expanded significantly with discovery of this fossil.


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Kent Steward, Director   |  ksteward@fhsu.edu  |  Kurt Beyers, Assistant Director   |  kbeyers@fhsu.edu